Friday, 25 February 2011

Another from the Daniel Cure "Demo Tape Cellar" – Solo

This is just a quick entry from my battered vault of rough recordings from the period 1999 – 2003, in which I moved from Nausea to Mary Jane to, well, bandless. Although the vocals are fairly lacklustre and the sound quality is warped from a years of damp storage, I quite like the chord progression and the outro solo remains one of my favourite…



Anyway…enjoy…

Thursday, 17 February 2011

On this day, 550 years ago, the Second Battle of St Albans was fought...

With a nod to the fact that this blog was originally created to add weight and substance to my historical novels, (since then, it’s all rather descended into chaos) I thought I would start a “mini-series” of “on this day” type-entries. Now, to kick us off, I thought I would remain topical to the nature of the Jack Templeman series…

So, on this day, 550 years ago, the second Battle of St Albans was fought between the Yorkists and the Lancastrians. Unlike the first battle (yes, the one that featured in “The Silver Knight”), the
Earl of Warwick's army was defeated by a Lancastrian force under Queen Margaret, who recovered control of her husband, King Henry VI. And yes, this battle will feature in the third in the Jack Templeman series, yet to be written…

Saturday, 12 February 2011

More from the Daniel Cure "Demo Tape Cellar" - Ephesia

Having started with a couple of tracks from Nausea, I am going to go back even further, this time to the very first band I was part of. I say the very first – I don’t count a collection of “idea bands” that were scribbled down on paper with ambitious aims for greatness…

I was asked to join Ephesia (though the name was not in place at that stage – and yes it was my suggestion) as a vocalist for a gig in 1996 (I believe it was someone’s birthday party, but my memory is a little hazy). I then became singer and part-vocalist for the bands duration – probably lasting twelve months or so when I moved away from Droitwich for a short time.





The two tracks I have included here are probably the only two that are “listenable” – I mean to say that the other four or five that have survived are a little too raw to be worthy of inclusion. Ephesia drew principally upon the influence of what is now know as the “New Wave of American Heavy Metal” – bands such as Sepultura, Pantera, Machine Head, et al, but also owed much to Korn, who had only just emerged at the time. You will probably not gain too much of this from these two tracks as they are more on the “mellow side” – but nonetheless…



“My Daydream” was (I believe) the very first thing I wrote and is only a little worse for wear as a result of the tape stretching and making what is an ethereal recording perhaps too warped and psychedelic at times. “What We Should Be” was the result of a band jam (always a rewarding experience) and contains some interesting Eastern licks. Just a shame that our primitive recording approach let the vocals down. Still, we were only sixteen.

Anyway…enjoy…

Tuesday, 8 February 2011

Introducing the Daniel Cure Demo Tape Archive...

Those of you who have visited my YouTube Channel will have noticed that there are a number of rock and metal demo tracks that I have uploaded in previous weeks that are of dubious identity.



The reason for this is that I have been embarking upon a review of what seems like about five hundred old demo tapes from an assortment of bands that I have either played in or had an involvement with.

The first batch were from Nausea, a band I played guitar in between 1998 and 1999, who recorded a demo during a period of gigs in the West Midlands. You can see influences of the Deftones, Silverchair, Feeder and I suppose RATM in Nausea's style, something that a number of people will recall from the succession of "Battle of the Bands" victories enjoyed at the time. Ive embedded a couple of tracks in this blog...check out my YouTube Channel for the other Nausea tracks...




I should point out that this is nothing more than a garage-clearing exercise designed to serve my own amusments, so enjoy and look out for more to come...

Thursday, 3 February 2011

Sleuth - 1972

I recently had the pleasure of watching Sleuth – I refer not to the recent Jude Law version, but the original (I have not yet seen the remake). It’s a fantastic and quite unusual film, with a top performance from Michael Caine and a masterly, masterly performance from the late great Laurence Olivier as the hammy, eccentric Andrew Wyke.

The thing is about this film (if you have not had the pleasure) is that there are only two actors in the entire two-and-a-bit hours of screentime. There are no special effects, blue screens, or CGI. Not only that, but the dialogue is rich and varied enough to cover several entire encyclopaedic volumes of script. Where have films like this gone? Where have the disappeared to? Why were the best films made in the 1970s? What happened before or since that time to create such an artistic malaise? Or is it simply a case of certain conditions within that decade creating a film-making paradigm of utopia beyond the usual limits of quality?

Anyway, if you haven’t seen it already – find yourself a copy…